Citizen Technologist

The CTSP Blog

2021 Fellowship FAQs

LAST UPDATED Nov 24, 2020

We added more frequently asked questions for the 2021 Call for Applications after our information session on Thursday, Nov. 19th.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Do I need a letter of recommendation from a faculty member?

A: No. The application does not ask for a letter of recommendation from a faculty member. However, if you are proposing a project with a community partner, you should have a letter of support from the community partner.

Q: Do I need to submit a budget for my project?

A: The application does not require a budget, although you may choose to include one if you feel it would be useful.

Q: Will I need to submit receipts or other proof of expenses?

A: Not for fellowship stipends. Fellowship stipends are disbursed to fellows as unrestricted honorarium at the beginning of the fellowship year to UC Berkeley students. Fellows must acknowledge CTSP support in publications and other outputs resulting from their fellowship related work.

Q: Should my proposed project have a tangible deliverable that is described in the project proposal?

A: Proposals should include one or more clearly defined outcomes. The scope of what you or your team may propose to do is open-ended and may include a publishable paper, a detailed design or engineering prototype, a whitepaper or regulatory proposal, a public event or a documentary film. However, we acknowledge that in the course of the year your research goals may shift such that your plans for a deliverable change. That’s ok, and is in fact a common part of doing research.

Q: Do I have to produce a deliverable by the end of the fellowship year?

A:  The only final deliverable we require is a statement (approximately 1 page long) describing what you have done during your fellowship year.

Q: Can I submit more than one project proposal?

A: Yes, you can submit (or be part of a group submitting) more than one proposal. Since proposals are chosen through a blind review, each of your proposals will be evaluated separately. If a fellow is accepted to work on more than one project they will still receive one stipend.

Q: Does my project have to fit in one of the focus areas?

Yes, the focus areas are purposely broad (and can overlap), so that it will not be a difficult fit for you project. If you think your project does not fit, you can choose the focus area that is closest to your project category. The focus areas you choose will help us see how you interpret the area(s) that you see your project fitting in.

Q: What kind of final product do I need to have? How does this relate to showing my impact?

The final product for your project can depend on the audience that you intend it for. We want to see you think through who that audience is and how you hope to have an impact in the discussion of your final product. For example, if you hope to reach a general audience, you might aim for a blog post or op-ed. Also, remember that the final product you plan on in your application is not a fixed requirement. We know that over the course of the year plans may shift – that is OK!

Q: If I also applied to CTLC for funding can I apply to CTSP? 

Yes. We coordinate with CLTC when making our decisions, so they are aware of the projects that we accept to be CTSP-CLTC projects. You can indicate that you have applied for CLTC by checking that box on your application.

Q: How does it work if I  have non-UCB students on a project?

Logistically, it is VERY hard for us to disburse funds to a non-UCB student. That is why we require that every project have a UCB student on the team. In the case of teams with some non-UCB students, we will disburse all of the funds to the UCB student(s) and let them divide the money among their teammates. Just note that for tax purposes the person who we disburse the money to will be responsible for paying taxes on all of it.

Q: Can I apply with a new project if I was a fellow in the past ?

Yes! We have had many fellows come back with new projects (or continuations of past projects). Remember, that applications are de-identified so we will judge your application like all the others.

Q: If I have a project with someone who could be considered a client, do they need to be included in the reflexivity or team members questions?

You could include that person as a team member and then yes, include them in the team members and reflexivity sections. Or you can have them be a client and then they play less of a role in your application but are indicated in a letter of support (so we know that you have actually discussed this idea with them). It’s really up to you and the kind of relationship you want to have with this person/organization.

Q: What does the mentorship section mean? 

This is another part of the application that is trying to get you to think through what you want to do and get out of your CTSP project. If there are ways that you anticipate getting mentorship out of your team – for example, a grad student and an undergrad could have a mentoring relationship while both being fellows on a project together. Or, maybe you hope to leverage your connection to CTSP to gain access to other kinds of mentorship – to professors in other departments, people in industry or policy, or even with our wonderful CTSP alums. This is a space to indicate that!

Q: It’s really hard to find a partner for a new project given that we are in a pandemic and have has fewer chances to get to know people, their interests, working style, etc. What if I want to apply for a project that needs other team members, but I don’t know who those people are yet? Can I apply for more money with the expectation that it will support me and a team member yet to be determined?

This is a new issue, but one that makes a lot of sense. You can apply and make the case for why you need more team members, what their roles will be and how you will identify them. We can’t promise that we will give you more money, but we will consider it.

Q: What if we need more space than the one page provided for the positionality statement? 

Since this is part of the identified application, you can email us (ctsp@nullberkeley.edu) an additional page – just include the title of the project and explain that it’s for the positionality statement.

Q: Is the section on racial and/or indigenous justice required? 

Yes. Explicitly we want to see at least one citation that references either the researchers that we highlight here (link) or another that you choose. Beyond that we want to see you think through how your idea intersects with this issue. You do not need to summarize all of the points of the work you reference, but tell us how it is related to your proposed project.

If you still have questions about the Call for Applications, send us an email!

Technology + Racial and Indigenous Justice 

We the CTSP leadership acknowledge that academia, grantmaking bodies, foundations, science, policy, and technology have historically and currently reproduced and reinforced structural and systemic racism. As a grantmaking body that is part of an academic institution that sits on occupied territory, we are actively committed to restorative justice practices such as encouraging and educating fellows and the UC Berkeley community at large to contribute to the Shuumi Land Tax. In addition, we promote active and ongoing reflection on how we can ensure that our research and community is aware of both adverse and positive impacts of research, even social impact and social good research. Therefore, all applications for the 2021 CTSP Fellowship must address racial justice in addition to one of the focus areas. We offer the list of resources below as a starting point for applicants (and others) to reference when considering how issues of race, anti-Black racism, and Indigenous rights intersect with technology.

This is a living document – this means that you can suggest books, media, and other educational resources through this form

Race & Technology

Books:

  • Race after Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code by Ruha Benjamin, 2019
  • Captivating Technology: Race, Carceral Technoscience, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life edited by Ruha Benjamin, 2019
  • Distributed Blackness: African American Cybercultures by André Brock, 2020
  • Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness by Simone Browne, 2015
  • Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, From the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter, Charlton D. McIlwain, 2019
  • Digitizing Race: Visual Cultures of the Internet by Lisa Nakamura, 2008
  • Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life edited by Alondra Nelson, Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, and Alicia Headlam Hines, 2001
  • Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism by Safiya Umoja Noble, 2018
  • Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century by Dorothy Roberts, 2012

 

Articles and Chapters:

 

Other Projects:

 

Indigenous Science & Technology

(These suggestions come from a longer syllabus put together by our colleagues at the Indigenous Technologies program of the Berkeley Center for New Media, see here for their whole syllabus)

Land Back/Land Stewardship

Recommended by Corrina Gould, co-founder of the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust

 

Indigenous Cyberspace

Recommended by Skawennati, Artist & Co-Director of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace

  • She Falls for Ages (2016): a machinima by Skawennati. This sci-fi retelling of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) creation story reimagines Sky World as a futuristic, utopic space and Sky Woman as a brave astronaut and world-builder.
    • Readings: The book Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson (1992) greatly influenced me in this machinima.
  • TimeTravellerTM: a nine-episode machinima series developed by Skawennati between 2008 and 2013 in the virtual world Second Life, where users can create and activate avatars.
    • Readings: The Myth of the Earth Grasper influenced me in this work, as did the book Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clarke (1953)
  • Imagining the Next Seven Generations,” Skawennati at TEDxMontrealWomen. Cinema Imperial, Montreal, QC. (30 May 2015)

 

Genocide and Survivance

Recommended by Corrina Gould, co-founder of the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust

  • An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873 by Benjamin Madley (2016)
  • A Time of Little Choice: The Disintegration of Tribal Culture in the San Francisco Bay Area 1769-1810 by Randall Milliken (1995)

 

Indigenous Knowledges/Indigenous Science

Recommended by Indigenous Technologies staff

  • Native Science: Natural Laws of Interdependence by Gregory Cajete (2000)
  • by Zapotec Science: Farming and Food in the Northern Sierra of Oaxaca Roberto Gonzalez (2001)
  • Spiral to the Stars: Mvskoke Tools of Futurity by Laura Harjo (2019)
  • Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer (2013)

Resources:

 

Futurity

 

CTSP Fellows Retreat 2020

In February, we held our first ever CTSP Retreat gathering 40+ new and former CTSP fellows, board members, and past and present co-directors throughout the all day event. The day long event featured several opportunities for new fellows to get to know each other’s projects, talk to alums about their career paths, and learn about past CTSP projects.

We are so grateful  to all the current fellows and alums who joined and participated in these critical discussions about their projects and how CTSP helped shape their research agenda, careers, and trajectories.

a group of people stand in front of a brick building

Thematic Breakout Groups

To kick off the day, new fellows gathered in thematic groups related to their CTSP project to meet the other fellows in their cohort and share their plans for the year.

  • Infrastructures
  • Power, Algorithms & Online Communities
  • Privacy & AI
  • Cybersecurity Tools & Actors

CTSP Alums Panel

Four alums reflected on their CTSP projects, sharing strategies for overcoming common challenges like gaining access to industry or government actors, and telling us how their projects led into other work.

four women seated in a row

Madelena Ng, Amy Turner, Naniette Coleman, and Mehtab Khan

Naniette Coleman, PhD Candidate in Sociology, I Regret To Inform You That Your Private Information Has Been Compromised (2017)

Mehtab Khan, JSD Candidate 2020, Affect & Facial Recognition in Hiring (2019)

Madelena Ng, DrPH Candidate in Public Health, The state of smartphone-based observational studies: ethical and practical considerations in informed consent and health data disclosure (2019)

Amy Turner, MIMS 2020, Coordinated Entry System Research and Development for a Continuum of Care in Northern California (2019)

Public Interest Technology Careers

Finally, fellows chatted with CTSP and MIMS alums, and some CTSP board members about how to bring the mission of CTSP into their work after graduation. These groups were broadly organized around the following themes:

  • Critical Design & Design Research
  • Tech Worker Organizing & Ethics
  • Government & Non-profit
  • User Experience
  • Inference, Experiments, & Data Driven Research

Social Impact Un-Pitch Day 2020

On Thursday, October 15th at 5pm the Center for Technology, Society & Policy (CTSP) and the School of Information’s Information Management Student Association (IMSA) are co-hosting the fifth annual Social Impact Un-Pitch Day!

Join CTSP and IMSA to brainstorm ideas for projects that address the challenges of technology, society, and policy. We welcome students, community organizations, local municipal partners, faculty, and campus initiatives to discuss discrete problems that project teams can take on over the course of this academic year. Teams will be encouraged to apply to CTSP to fund their projects.

This event is open to everyone – Berkeley graduate and undergraduate students, faculty, staff or affiliates, and anyone in the public.

Location: Register here for Zoom link.

Livestream: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtOiHZI4Mak

Agenda

  • 5:10 Introductions from CTSP
  • 5:20 Example Projects
  • 5:30 Sharing Un-Pitches (3 minutes per Un-Pitch)
  • 6:00 Open chat – we will leave zoom open to allow participants to connect and chat about projects and collaborations

Un-Pitches

Un-Pitches are meant to be informal and brief introductions of yourself, your idea, or your organization’s problem situation. Un-pitches can include designing technology, research, policy recommendations, and more. Students and social impact representatives will be given 3 minutes to present their Un-Pitch. In order to un-pitch, please share 1-3 slides, as PDF and/or a less than 500-word description—at this email: ctsp@nullberkeley.edu. You can share slides and/or description of your ideas even if you aren’t able to attend. Deadline to share materials: midnight October 14th, 2020.

Submit your un-pitch idea here.

If you are unable to attend, but have an idea to un-pitch, still submit it and one of the co-directors will present your un-pitch at the event.

Funding Opportunities

The next application round for fellows will open in November. CTSP’s fellowship program will provide small grants to individuals and small teams of fellows for 2019. CTSP also has a recurring offer of small project support.

Prior Projects & Collaborations

Here are several examples of projects that members of the I School community have pursued as MIMS final projects or CTSP Fellow projects (see more projects from 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020).

 

Skills & Interests of Students

The above projects demonstrate a range of interests and skills of the I School community. Students here and more broadly on the UC Berkeley campus are interested and skilled in all aspects of where information and technology meets people—from design and data science, to user research and information policy.

The Powerful and the Powerless: Reflections from FAccT 2020

By Zoe Kahn, CTSP Fellow 2019

Images of people soaring through space wearing astronaut helmets adorn the walls of a narrow hallway leading from the street-level entrance to the hotel lobby elevator bank. A life-sized model of an astronaut stands off to the side of the hotel registration desk. It’s safe to say… the conference hotel has an outer space theme. 

The words “What is fairness?” repeat on a large circular digital display at the center of the hotel lobby. I can’t decide if the display belongs in a newsroom, stock trade room, or train station. Perhaps art? Perhaps commentary? 

The word in question changes each day. What is Fairness? What is Accountability? What is Transparency? What questions are we missing? 

Image of digital sign reading "what is fairness?"

It is here—in Barcelona, Spain—that ~600 people gather for the ACM Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency (FAccT) conference to discuss efforts to design, develop, deploy, and evaluate machine learning models in ways that are more fair, accountable, and transparent. 

Despite the conference’s roots in computer science, there were several papers, tutorials, and CRAFT sessions that challenged the community to think beyond technical fixes to broader socio-technical contexts rife with power and complex social dynamics.

Let me begin with a discussion of power. The ACLU of Washington and the Media Mobilizing Project put on a terrific CRAFT session titled, Creating Community-Based Tech Policy: Case Studies, Lessons Learned, and What Technologist and Communities Can Do Together. The two-part session first documented the ACLU of Washington’s efforts, in partnership with academics primarily from the University of Washington (Katell et al., 2020), to include marginalized and vulnerable communities in the development of tech policy surrounding the acquisition and use of surveillance technologies in the City of Seattle. The Media Mobilizing Project then presented their work investigating the use of risk assessment tools in the criminal justice system across the country. And, in particular, their efforts with community groups to combat the use of criminal justice risk assessment tools in Philadelphia. Taken together, the session provided models for meaningfully engaging marginalized and vulnerable populations in algorithmic accountability, forming the foundation for workshop participants to reflect upon their own power.

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“The perverse absent-presence”: Disability and the perception of archival representation

Join CTSP, AFOG, and the UC Berkeley Disability Studies in welcoming Gracen Brilmyer, a 2016 CTSP fellow and MIMS 2016 alum, as they present research for their dissertation in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). To make this event accessible for all guests, we ask for your help in making this event FRAGRANCE-FREE [details below].

When: February 4th, 2020, 4:10 – 5:30 pm
Where: South Hall, Room 202

For disabled people, how we see ourselves in history matters. Disabled minds and bodies have historically entered into archival records through the criminalization of disabled—and other marginalized—identities, resulting in the creation of legal, medical, and institutional records making up the majority of records documenting disability. And this, in turn effects the ways in which disability is understood; as disability is often simplified to a medical deficit, a ‘problem’ to be fixed, records such as these have the potential to reinforce stereotypes, perpetuate harmful rhetorics, and limit the perception of disability as purely a medical ‘problem’ of the body or mind.

Lying at the intersection of archival studies, disability studies and qualitative research, this presentation addresses the ways in which disabled people use archives, witness themselves in history, and understand their collective identity. Given that disabled people are often documented through violent processes—such as asylums, arrest records, and medical interventions—this research investigates disabled people’s complicated relationships with historical representation. Through interviews with disabled scholars, artists, activists and community members, this research highlights (1) how we witness the violences of the past through archives, (2) how we often expect to be erased in history, yet, (3) even though much documentation about disabled people is made by people in power, we can complicate the limited perspectives of this documentation and understand it as part of a history of oppression. By centering disabled people’s voices, this presentation considers not only how archival misrepresentation impacts the ways in which non-disabled people may perceive disability, but also how we understand ourselves—as individuals, as a collective, and as part of a political history—in order to demonstrate the complexity of our relationships to archives.

Gracen Brilmyer is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where they are also pursuing a certificate in gender studies. Their research lies at the intersection of disability studies, archival studies, and the history of science, where they address coloniality, affect, and disability, primarily within natural history. Their work has been published in Archival Science and Archivaria, and various other journals. They have also published a poster, “Dismantling White Supremacy in Archives,” with Michelle Caswell in the Library Quarterly. They have a background working with biological collections and hold a Master of Information Management and Systems from University of California Berkeley.


Fragrance-Free Event
To make this event accessible for all guests, we ask for your help in making this event FRAGRANCE-FREE. Please refrain from wearing scented products such as perfumes/colognes, scented lotions, clothing with strong detergent scents, etc. while attending this event as they can trigger serious health issues for those with fragrance allergies. We aim to maintain a welcoming and accessible environment for all faculty, staff, students, and visitors. Thank you for your consideration for all members of our community. More info can be found at: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/scentfree.html

This event will be live captioned and ASL interpreted. The room is wheelchair accessible via elevator. To request any other accessibility accommodations, please contact: Anne Jonas annejonas@nullberkeley.edu

Co-sponsored by AFOG and UC Berkeley Disability Studies.

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Information Session for 2020 Fellow Applications

Interested in applying to be a 2020 CTSP fellow? Come to an information session on Wednesday, Nov. 20th at 4:30 PM in South Hall Room 6 (in the basement).

A reminder about eligibility and the funding model for 2020 (for more details see the Call for Applications):

2020 Fellowship Model

  •   Individual and Paired teams will typically receive $2,000/each.
  •   Teams with more than 2 members will receive a maximum of $5,000 total, with funding levels determined by project scope. You may optionally submit a budget detailing how your team would allocate up to $5,000.

With rare exceptions, projects must include a UC Berkeley student to be eligible. Projects that do not include a UC Berkeley student may be considered but may shift funding allocation.

UPDATE: The Information Session is past but we are sharing FAQs that came up at the session below.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Do I need a letter of recommendation from a faculty member?

A: No. The application does not ask for a letter of recommendation from a faculty member. However, if you are proposing a project with a community partner, you should have a letter of support from the community partner.

Q: Do I need to submit a budget for my project?

A: The application does not require a budget, although you may choose to include one if you feel it would be useful.

Q: Will I need to submit receipts or other proof of expenses?

A: Not for fellowship stipends. Fellowship stipends are disbursed to fellows as unrestricted honorarium at the beginning of the fellowship year to UC Berkeley students. Fellows must acknowledge CTSP support in publications and other outputs resulting from their fellowship related work.

Q: Should my proposed project have a tangible deliverable that is described in the project proposal?

A: Proposals should include one or more clearly defined outcomes. The scope of what you or your team may propose to do is open-ended and may include a publishable paper, a detailed design or engineering prototype, a whitepaper or regulatory proposal, a public event or a documentary film. However, we acknowledge that in the course of the year your research goals may shift such that your plans for a deliverable change. That’s ok, and is in fact a common part of doing research.

Q: Do I have to produce a deliverable by the end of the fellowship year?

A:  The only final deliverable we require is a statement (approximately 1 page long) describing what you have done during your fellowship year.

Q: Can I submit more than one project proposal?

A: Yes, you can submit (or be part of a group submitting) more than one proposal. Since proposals are chosen through a blind review, each of your proposals will be evaluated separately. If a fellow is accepted to work on more than one project they will still receive one stipend.

If you still have questions about the Call for Applications, send us an email!

“Loved learning the latest” – A Great Night Celebrating CTSP at Google PAIR

CTSP Co-Directors Elizabeth Resor and Anne Jonas present in front of a slide that says "Center for Technology, Society & Policy" with a few images from CTSP projects

CTSP Co-Directors Elizabeth Resor and Anne Jonas offer introductory remarks

On October 22nd CTSP fellows, alums, past and current Co-Directors, faculty advisors and many members of the Bay Area technology community gathered at Google SF for an evening of talks, posters, and lots of mingling, hosted by Google’s PAIR team. Despite BART delays reminding us the ripple effects of complicated infrastructural breakdowns, we had a magical evening guided by Michelle Carney, CTSP alum and founder of MLUX, in exploring the work CTSP has done, our vision for what’s next, and the broader connections around society, policy, and technology.

4 people standing together and smiling

CTSP Faculty Advisory Board member Mike Rivera, CTSP Fellow Ayo Animashaun, Faculty Advisory Board member Alex Hughes, and Fellow Mahmoud Hamsho at the reception

We reflected on CTSP’s origins and progress over the last 5 years, exploring how Galen Panger and Nicholas Doty had prescient insight in developing a center that took seriously the politics of sociotechnical systems and recognized the cutting-edge work being done in the I School community and beyond. It has been so energizing to see CTSP fellows go on to become leading faculty, community advocates, policy-makers, and trusted advisors for the tech industry. As Jess Holbrook of PAIR reminded us, we must be wary of the powerful trying to claim expertise in developing solutions and alternatives to the very problems they have enabled, and instead look to those who have long been working collaboratively and carefully on the ground (and in the cloud) for their wisdom and best practices. We are so proud to count CTSP fellows among these experts.

Galen Panger talks with two peopel with their backs to the camera in front of a poster

CTSP Co-Founder Galen Panger networks at the poster reception

At this event, we got to hear lightning talks from four CTSP project teams and to learn more about another ten projects in posters displayed around the event space. Fellows were thrilled to make connections across cohort years and with those working on a variety of projects inside academia and out. It was especially inspiring to see how some projects have grown and continued over the years. Check out the fantastic posters above!

Franchesca Spektor presents on her team's project in front of audience

CTSP Fellow Franchesca Spektor presents on her team’s project

 

Thank you to everyone who attended and/or made a poster!

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Engage, Design, Examine: Celebrating Five Years of CTSP

Come celebrate our 5 Year Anniversary!

To celebrate this fifth year of CTSP we are hosting an event with the Google PAIR team to bring together CTSP alums and current fellows with the local technology community. Come learn about CTSP projects with lightning talks and posters addressing our core focus areas of Health + Sensors, Sustaining Democracy and Building Community, Integrating Safety & Privacy, and Just Algorithms: Fairness, Transparency, and Justice, spark connections with others committed to public interest technology, and help shape the future of CTSP!

When: Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019, 5 – 8:30pm

Where: Google SF, 345 Spear Street, SF, CA 94105

RSVP

Agenda

5:00 – doors open, social hour

6:00 – 6:15 – CTSP + PAIR Welcome!

6:15 – 6:45 – CTSP 5 Year Recap & 5 Project Talks

6:45 – 8:30 – social hour & poster session

While you learn and mingle enjoy light snacks and refreshments provided by Google!

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Social Impact Un-Pitch Day 2019

On Thursday, September 26th at 6pm the Center for Technology, Society & Policy (CTSP) and the School of Information’s Information Management Student Association (IMSA) are co-hosting the fourth annual Social Impact Un-Pitch Day!

Join CTSP and IMSA to brainstorm ideas for projects that address the challenges of technology, society, and policy. We welcome students, community organizations, local municipal partners, faculty, and campus initiatives to discuss discrete problems that project teams can take on over the course of this academic year. Teams will be encouraged to apply to CTSP to fund their projects.

Location: Room 202, in South Hall.

RSVP here!

Livestream

Agenda

  • 6:10 Introductions from IMSA and CTSP
  • 6:15 Example Projects
  • 6:20 Sharing Un-Pitches (3 minutes per Un-Pitch)
  • 7:10 Mixer (with snacks and refreshments)

 

Un-Pitches

Un-Pitches are meant to be informal and brief introductions of yourself, your idea, or your organization’s problem situation. Un-pitches can include designing technology, research, policy recommendations, and more. Students and social impact representatives will be given 3 minutes to present their Un-Pitch. In order to un-pitch, please share 1-3 slides, as PDF and/or a less than 500-word description—at this email: ctsp@nullberkeley.edu. You can share slides and/or description of your ideas even if you aren’t able to attend. Deadline to share materials: midnight September 25th, 2019.

Funding Opportunities

The next application round for fellows will open in November. CTSP’s fellowship program will provide small grants to individuals and small teams of fellows for 2019. CTSP also has a recurring offer of small project support.

Prior Projects & Collaborations

Here are several examples of projects that members of the I School community have pursued as MIMS final projects or CTSP Fellow projects (see more projects from 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019).

 

Skills & Interests of Students

The above projects demonstrate a range of interests and skills of the I School community. Students here and more broadly on the UC Berkeley campus are interested and skilled in all aspects of where information and technology meets people—from design and data science, to user research and information policy.

RSVP here!